Doing the Dingleberry Twist (and other rotational matters)

Well, I picked up the final piece of the puzzle last week….the Flex Hone.  This cool tool is used with a power drill to hone the bores.  Another common name in the US for it is a dingleberry hone.  The first one I ordered from the US, and after 30 days had not shown up.  Not wanting to wait any longer, I bought one locally for twice the price 😦

You can see the condition of the bores before I started – they are nice and shiny, and have a small ridge at the top.

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You use a light oil (e.g. engine oil) with a dingleberry hone, so I imagined oil flying everywhere.  I put up a few old sheets to try and catch the spray and prevent it making a mess on the concrete.  Not pretty, but functional.

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I first tried to use the hone with my cordless drill as it would have been convenient, however it didn’t have enough power to spin the hone fast enough.  I changed over to my power drill, and things got more exciting.  The trick with the dingleberry hone is to move it up and down the bore fast enough to give you around 45 degrees intersection between the in and out lines.  At the slowest speed, I had to move the hone pretty quick.  I ran the hone in and out about 50 times (until it knocked the edge off the ridge), and then reversed the drill and gave it another 30 cycles.  The result was most excellent!

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You can see the ridge is still there, however the hone rounded off the sharp corner.  For your entertainment, I had my 9 year old son Tom record me using the hone.  You can now understand why I hung the sheets to catch the oil spray.  Even though the hone was very forgiving with alignment, I found that I needed to focus to keep the hone in a straight line.

Once the honing was complete, it was time to clean the block.  Brush Research recommend cleaning the bores with soap, water and a bristled brush to make sure you get all of the grit and oil out of the bores.  If any grit from the hone remained in the bore surface, it would play havoc with the rings, bearings and camshaft when you start the engine for the first time.  I gave the block a good once over with some Amway LOC and warm water and a bannister brush, and followed up with a squirt using the Karcher pressure cleaner.  I wasn’t totally convinced that this got all of it so then used Sugar Soap and warm water followed by another good once over with the Karcher.  While I was at it, I also gave the water jacker a good session with the Karcher, and managed to get a surprising amount of crud out.  The block was hot tanked twice, which I thought would clean it all out.

After everything was super clean, I started drying it with compressed air, which was like washing a car with a toothbrush! After thinking about it, I remembered that my vacuum cleaner can also be used as a blower.  I connected the hose to the air outlet, and it worked brilliantly.  I have used this vacuum cleaner for so many things – it is one device which I am glad I spent the extra money on when I originally purchased it. 10 minutes later the block was clean & dry inside and out.

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This was the perfect time to blow a quick coat of paint on the block.  First I had to mask up the block to control where the paint went.

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To start I sprayed a couple of light coats of VHT Engine Enamel Grey Primer……

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….followed by a couple of coats of the final colour.  This will be enough for now.  Once the engine is together I will give it another coat, and then follow up with clear.

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Next task was to install some welch and freeze plugs.  I first installed the two oil gallery welch plugs at the front of the engine.  These plugs close off the oil gallery which supplies the lifters.  Next I installed the six freeze plugs in the side of the block.  I sealed each plug with my ever faithful Permatex Aviation Form-a-Gasket.  I still feel like I am flying blind whenit comes to sealing the freeze plugs.  They look similar to the old ones, so I should be good.

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Distributor

I also made a start on the distributor during the week.  It was greasy and dirty, so the first step was to pull it apart so I could drop it in the Simple Green bath.  You can see it was pretty makny – I expect this is the first rebuild it has ever had.  The springs for the mechanical advance mechanism were seriously stretched, and almost fell off when I removed them.

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Reading the workshop manual, I needed to file or grind the burred over head off of the pin which holds the gear onto the shaft so I can remove it.  This pin was seriously tight, so it took a some decent hits with a hammer and punch to get it moving.  I had to drive it all the way out.

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Once the pin was out I was able to get the shaft out of the distributor.  I also found a tiny little circlip around the top of the distributor body which held on the top plate.  If you didn’t look close, you would miss this.

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Once fully dismantled, I placed the main parts in the Simple Green.  Stay tuned for re-assembly, which will include installing a Pertronix Ignitor III.

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